Leather Jacket Refashion

beforeandafter

Last summer my dad gave me his old, beaten-up leather jacket that he was planning on getting rid of. Obviously it was way too big on me, but I had plans to turn it into something more stylish and fitted. I ended up using Aicha’s variation of the jacket pattern in the BurdaStyle Sewing Handbook. After I cut apart the leather and quilted lining I realized I had just barely enough material to make this jacket. Luckily it was a cropped style. You can see that there are weird seam lines criss-crossing the jacket from where it was sewn together before.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The pattern called for using ribbing for the collar and cuffs, but I used a claret colored wool instead. I re-used the zipper and waistband from the original jacket, and I also cut apart and re-sewed the quilted lining.

Sewing leather is a pain, especially when you’re going through multiple layers. A lot of the time the pieces just didn’t want to hold together, so I had to go back over them once or twice. The problem with that is the needle punches holes in the leather that don’t heal back up, so you end up with a hole-riddled mess. It came together in the end though, and hopefully it’ll be sturdy enough to last for a while. I’m definitely not planning on sewing with leather again anytime soon.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The weather here’s been crazy. It was 80°F when I was taking these pictures, but two days before that it was in the 30s. For about the last month the weather’s been swinging back and forth between extremes. Hopefully it’ll stay cool enough for me to wear my jacket a few more times, otherwise it’ll be time for my summer project: shorts.

Do you have any tips for sewing with leather? Please leave them in the comments below!

<3 Lindsay

Quick and easy sewing organization!

Today I want to share with you this simple and cheap way to store your sewing supplies! The other day I came across these IKEA spice racks ($3.99 each) on pinterest being used for children’s book shelves. I thought it would be a cute way to store my sewing books/patterns/magazines. Then my husband had the brilliant idea of hanging one of the shelves upside down so I could hang some of my tools off of the dowel while still using the top for storage.

To hang the shelf upside down just unscrew the metal plate on the back that the nail goes into, flip it upside down, and screw it back in. The shelf can easily be put together in 5 minutes. And this may sound odd, but I really love the screws that come with it. They have really deep sockets so the Allen wrench (also included) doesn’t come flying out every time you twist it.

Speaking of Allen wrenches, one time I got a flat by driving over railroad tracks and somehow getting an Allen wrench imbedded in my tire. Not sure how that happened… So please, when you’re done with your Allen wrench don’t throw it in the road… or off a train… ;)

A ten pack of these S-hooks only costs $0.99! And they’re the perfect size for hanging scissors, rotary cutters, etc. If you’re lucky enough to live near an IKEA, the spice racks and hooks can both be found in the kitchen storage area near the cabinet section. They also sell them online, but the shipping costs are pretty exorbitant.

I think these shelves would also look great stained or painted. If you put them up in your sewing room be sure to leave me a link! I’d love to see what ideas you all come up with!

<3 Lindsay